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Wednesday, June 14, 2006

Windows Installer XML (WiX) toolset

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Introduction

The Windows Installer XML (WiX) is a toolset that builds Windows installation packages from XML source code. The toolset supports a command line environment that developers may integrate into their build processes to build MSI and MSM setup packages.

More @ http://wix.sourceforge.net/index.html

Friday, May 12, 2006

Blu-ray Discs

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What is Blu-ray?
Blu-ray, also known as Blu-ray Disc (BD) is the name of a next-generation optical disc format. The format was developed to enable recording, rewriting and playback of high-definition video (HD), as well as storing large amounts of data. The format offers more than five times the storage capacity of traditional DVDs and can hold up to 25GB on a single-layer disc and 50GB on a dual-layer disc. For more general information about Blu-ray, please see our What is Blu-ray? section.

1.2
Why the name Blu-ray?
The name Blu-ray is derived from the underlying technology, which utilizes a blue-violet laser to read and write data. The name is a combination of "Blue" (blue-violet laser) and "Ray" (optical ray). According to the Blu-ray Disc Association the spelling of "Blu-ray" is not a mistake, the character "e" was intentionally left out so the term could be registered as a trademark. The correct full name is Blu-ray Disc, not Blu-ray Disk (incorrect spelling)The correct shortened name is Blu-ray, not Blu-Ray (incorrect capitalization) or Blue-ray (incorrect spelling)The correct abbreviation is BD, not BR or BRD (wrong abbreviation)

1.3
Who developed Blu-ray?
The Blu-ray Disc format was developed by the Blu-ray Disc Association (BDA), a group of leading consumer electronics, personal computer and media manufacturers, with more than 170 member companies from all over the world. The Board of Directors currently consists of: Apple Computer, Inc. Dell Inc.Hewlett Packard CompanyHitachi, Ltd.LG Electronics Inc.Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd.Mitsubishi Electric CorporationPioneer CorporationRoyal Philips ElectronicsSamsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Sharp CorporationSony CorporationTDK CorporationThomson MultimediaTwentieth Century FoxWalt Disney PicturesWarner Bros. Entertainment

1.4
What Blu-ray formats are planned?
As with conventional CDs and DVDs, Blu-ray plans to provide a wide range of formats including ROM/R/RW. The following formats are part of the Blu-ray Disc specification: BD-ROM - read-only format for distribution of HD movies, games, software, etc. BD-R - recordable format for HD video recording and PC data storage.BD-RE - rewritable format for HD video recording and PC data storage.There's also plans for a BD/DVD hybrid format, which combines Blu-ray and DVD on the same disc so that it can be played in both Blu-ray players and DVD players.

1.5
How much data can you fit on a Blu-ray disc?
A single-layer disc can hold 25GB.A dual-layer disc can hold 50GB.To ensure that the Blu-ray Disc format is easily extendable (future-proof) it also includes support for multi-layer discs, which should allow the storage capacity to be increased to 100GB-200GB (25GB per layer) in the future simply by adding more layers to the discs.

1.6
How much video can you fit on a Blu-ray disc?
Over 9 hours of high-definition (HD) video on a 50GB disc.About 23 hours of standard-definition (SD) video on a 50GB disc.

1.7
How fast can you read/write data on a Blu-ray disc?
According to the Blu-ray Disc specification, 1x speed is defined as 36Mbps. However, as BD-ROM movies will require a 54Mbps data transfer rate the minimum speed we're expecting to see is 2x (72Mbps). Blu-ray also has the potential for much higher speeds, as a result of the larger numerical aperture (NA) adopted by Blu-ray Disc. The large NA value effectively means that Blu-ray will require less recording power and lower disc rotation speed than DVD and HD-DVD to achieve the same data transfer rate. While the media itself limited the recording speed in the past, the only limiting factor for Blu-ray is the capacity of the hardware. If we assume a maximum disc rotation speed of 10,000 RPM, then 12x at the outer diameter should be possible (about 400Mbps). This is why the Blu-ray Disc Association (BDA) already has plans to raise the speed to 8x (288Mbps) or more in the future.

1.8
What video codecs will Blu-ray support?
MPEG-2 - enhanced for HD, also used for playback of DVDs and HDTV recordings.MPEG-4 AVC - part of the MPEG-4 standard also known as H.264 (High Profile and Main Profile).SMPTE VC-1 - standard based on Microsoft's Windows Media Video (WMV) technology. Please note that this simply means that all Blu-ray players and recorders will have to support playback of these video codecs, it will still be up to the movie studios to decide which video codec(s) they use for their releases.

1.9
What audio codecs will Blu-ray support?
Linear PCM (LPCM) - offers up to 8 channels of uncompressed audio.Dolby Digital (DD) - format used for DVDs also known as AC3, offers 5.1-channel surround sound.Dolby Digital Plus (DD+) - extension of DD, offers increased bitrates and 7.1-channel surround sound.Dolby TrueHD - extension of MLP Lossless, offers lossless encoding of up to 8 channels of audio.DTS Digital Surround - format used for DVDs, offers 5.1-channel surround sound.DTS-HD - extension of DTS, offers increased bitrates and up to 8 channels of audio. Please note that this simply means that all Blu-ray players and recorders will have to support playback of these audio codecs, it will still be up to the movie studios to decide which audio codec(s) they use for their releases.

1.10
Will Blu-ray discs require a cartridge?
No, the development of new low cost hard-coating technologies has made the cartridge obsolete. Blu-ray will instead rely on hard-coating for protection, which when applied will make the discs even more resistant to scratches and fingerprints than today's DVDs, while still preserving the same look and feel. Blu-ray also adopts a new error correction system which is more robust and efficient than the one used for DVDs.

1.11
Will Blu-ray require an Internet connection?
No, you will not need an Internet connection for basic playback of Blu-ray movies. The Internet connection will only be needed for value-added features such as downloading new extras, watching recent movie trailers, web browsing, etc. It will also be required to authorize managed copies of Blu-ray movies that can be transferred over a home network.

1.12
Will Blu-ray down-convert analog outputs?
No, Blu-ray players will not down-convert the analog output signal unless the video contains something called an Image Constraint Token (ICT). This feature is not part of the Blu-ray Disc spec, but of the AACS copy-protection system also adopted by HD-DVD. In the end it will be up to each movie studio to decide if they want to use this "feature" on their releases or not. The good news is that Sony, Disney, Fox, Paramount, MGM and Universal have already stated that they have no intention of using this feature. The other studios, which have yet to announce their plans, will most likely follow suit to avoid getting bad publicity. If any of the studios still decide to use ICT they will have to state this on the cover of their movies, so you should have no problem avoiding these titles.

1.13
Will Blu-ray support mandatory managed copy?
Yes, mandatory managed copy (MMC) will be part of the Blu-ray format. This feature will enable consumers to make legal copies of their Blu-ray movies that can be transferred over a home network. Please note that "mandatory" refers to the movies having to offer this capability, while it will be up to each hardware manufacturer to decide if they want to support this feature.

1.14
When will I be able to buy Blu-ray products?
If you live in the US, you will most likely have to wait until June 25, 2006 when Samsung will introduce their Blu-ray player (was recently pushed back from May 23, 2006). Pioneer and Sony plan to introduce their respective Blu-ray players in July. While we've heard very little about the launch plans for the European market, we expect it to follow shortly after the US (some products might launch earlier).

1.15
What will Blu-ray products cost?
As with any new technology the first generation of products will likely be quite expensive due to low production volumes. However, this shouldn't be a problem for long as there is a wide range of Blu-ray related products ( players, recorders, drives, writers, media, etc) planned, which should help drive up production volumes and lower overall production costs. Once mass production of components for Blu-ray products begins the prices are expected to fall quickly. According to the Blu-ray Disc Association, the overall cost of manufacturing Blu-ray Disc media will in the end be no more expensive than producing a DVD. The reduced injection molding costs (one molding machine instead of two, no birefringence problems) offset the additional cost of applying the cover layer and low cost hard-coat, while the techniques used for applying the recording layer remain the same. As production volumes increase the production costs should fall and eventually be comparable to DVDs.


Blu-ray vs DVD


Will Blu-ray replace DVDs?
Yes, that's the expectation. The Blu-ray format has received broad support from the major movie studios as a successor to today's DVD format. Seven of the eight major movie studios have already announced titles for Blu-ray, including Warner, Paramount, Fox, Disney, Sony, MGM and Lionsgate. The initial line-up is expected to consist of over 100 titles and include recent hits as well as classics such as Batman Begins, Desperado, Fantastic Four, Fifth Element, Hero, Ice Age, Kill Bill, Lethal Weapon, Mission Impossible, Ocean's Twelve, Pirates of the Caribbean, Reservoir Dogs, Robocop, and The Matrix. Many studios have also announced that they will begin releasing new feature films on Blu-ray Disc day-and-date with DVD, as well as a continuous slate of catalog titles every month. However, the two formats (Blu-ray and DVD) will most likely co-exist for quite some time until HDTVs become more widespread. For a complete list of the announced movies, please see our Blu-ray Movies section.


Will Blu-ray be backwards compatible with DVD?
Yes, several leading consumer electronics companies (including Sony, Panasonic, Philips, Samsung, Pioneer, Sharp and LG) have already demonstrated products that can read/write CDs, DVDs and Blu-ray discs using a BD/DVD/CD compatible optical head, so you don't have to worry about your existing DVD collection becoming obsolete. In fact, most of the Blu-ray players coming out will support upscaling of DVDs to 1080p/1080i, so your existing DVD collection will look even better than before. While it's up to each manufacturer to decide if they want to make their products backwards compatible with DVD, the format is far too popular to not be supported. The Blu-ray Disc Association (BDA) expects every Blu-ray Disc device to be backward compatible with DVDs.


Why should I upgrade from DVD to Blu-ray?
The simple answer is HDTV. If you've ever seen high-definition (HD) video on an HDTV, then you know just how incredibly sharp the picture is and how vivid the colors are. In fact, HD offers five times the amount of detail compared to standard-definition (SD). The problem with today's DVDs is that they only support SD and don't have the necessary storage capacity to satisfy the needs of HD. That's where Blu-ray comes in, it offers up to 50GB of storage capacity and enables playback, recording and rewriting of HD in all of the HD resolutions including 1080p. The format also supports high-definition audio formats and lossless audio. In addition to the greater video and audio quality, the extra storage capacity also means there will be plenty of room for additional content and special features. This combined with the new BD-J interactivity layer adopted by Blu-ray will bring the menus, graphics and special features to a whole new level. For example, you will be able to bring up the menu system as an overlay without stopping the movie, and you could have the director of the movie on the screen explaining the shooting of a scene while the scene is playing in the background. The advanced interactivity combined with the networking features of Blu-ray will also allow content producers to support new innovative features such as downloading extras, updating content via the web, and watching live broadcasts of special events. Thanks to the greatly enhanced HD video and audio quality as well as the advanced interactivity and networking features, Blu-ray represents a huge leap forward in the DVD viewing experience and will offer consumers an unprecedented HD experience.


What is the difference between Blu-ray and DVD?
Parameters
Blu-ray
DVD
Storage capacity
25GB (single-layer)50GB (dual-layer)
4.7GB (single-layer)8.5GB (dual-layer)
Laser wavelength
405nm (blue laser)
650nm (red laser)
Numerical aperture (NA)
0.85
0.60
Disc diameterDisc thickness
120mm1.2mm
120mm1.2mm
Protection layerHard coating
0.1mmYes
0.6mmNo
Track pitch
0.32�m
0.74�m
Data transfer rate (data)Data transfer rate (video/audio)
36.0Mbps (1x)54.0Mbps (1.5x)
11.08Mbps (1x)10.08Mbps (<1x) name="10aeb7363c929e04_bluray_replace_vcr">Will Blu-ray replace VCRs?
Yes, as VCRs don't support recording of HDTV programming consumers will soon need to replace them. Blu-ray recorders combined with hard drives offer a very flexible alternative for those that want to record HDTV. While HD-DVRs already allow consumers to record HDTV, the amount of HDTV programming that can be recorded and archived is limited by the size of the hard drive. Blu-ray recorders will offer a solution to this problem as they allow consumers to record the video to Blu-ray discs and then free up the hard drive. This should make them popular among people that want to archive a lot of their HDTV recordings. The Blu-ray recorders will also offer a lot of compelling new features not possible with a traditional VCR:
· Random access - instantly jump to any place on the disc
· Searching - quickly browse and preview recorded programs in real-time
· Create playlists - change the order of recorded programs and edit recorded video
· Simultaneous recording and playback of video (enables Time slip/Chasing playback)
· Automatically find an empty space to avoid recording over programs
· Improved picture - ability to record high-definition television (HDTV)
· Improved sound - ability to record surround sound (Dolby Digital, DTS, etc)


What about Blu-ray for PCs?
There are plans for BD-ROM (read-only), BD-R (recordable) and BD-RE (rewritable) drives for PCs, and with the support of the worlds two largest PC manufacturers, HP and Dell, it's very likely that the technology will be adopted as the next-generation optical disc format for PC data storage and replace technologies such as DVD�R, DVD�RW, and DVD-RAM.


Blu-ray vs HD-DVD


Is Blu-ray the same thing as HD-DVD?
No, HD-DVD (previously known as AOD) is the name of a competing next-generation optical disc format developed by Toshiba and NEC. The format is quite different from Blu-ray, but also relies heavily on blue-laser technology to achieve a higher storage capacity. The format is being developed within the DVD Forum as a possible successor to the current DVD technology.


What benefits does Blu-ray offer compared to HD-DVD?
Although both Blu-ray and HD-DVD are similar in many aspects, there are some important differences between them. The first is capacity. Because Blu-ray utilizes a lens with a greater numerical aperture (NA) than HD-DVD, the laser spot can be focused with greater precision to fit more data on the same size disc. This allows Blu-ray to hold 25GB per layer (50GB on a dual-layer disc), whereas HD-DVD can only hold 15GB per layer (30GB on a dual-layer disc). Blu-ray has also adopted a higher data transfer rate for video and audio (54Mbps vs 36.55Mbps). The greater capacity and data transfer rates for Blu-ray will allow the movie studios to release their movies with higher quality video and audio than the HD-DVD format. The second is content. The Blu-ray format has received broad support from the major movie studios as a successor to today's DVD format. Seven of the eight major movie studios (Warner, Paramount, Fox, Disney, Sony, MGM and Lionsgate) have already announced titles for Blu-ray, whereas HD-DVD only has support from three major movie studios (Warner, Paramount and Universal). This is an important difference because some of the studios might only support one of the formats, so you won't be able to get your favorite movies in the other format. Choosing the format with the most content support minimizes this risk. The third is hardware support. The Blu-ray format has broad support from the world's leading consumer electronics, personal computer and media manufacturers, including Sony, Panasonic, Philips, Samsung, Pioneer, Sharp, JVC, Hitachi, Mitsubishi, TDK, Thomson, LG, Apple, HP and Dell. The Blu-ray format will also be supported in the next-generation PlayStation 3 (PS3) video game console. This means that you will have a lot of choice when it comes to players and hardware. The HD-DVD format has far less supporters, so the amount of players and hardware will be very limited. So far, Toshiba is the only company to officially announce a HD-DVD player and it will only support 1080i output, while the announced Blu-ray players will support 1080p.


What is the difference between Blu-ray and HD-DVD?
Parameters
Blu-ray
HD-DVD
Storage capacity
25GB (single-layer)50GB (dual-layer)
15GB (single-layer)30GB (dual-layer)
Laser wavelength
405nm (blue laser)
405nm (blue laser)
Numerical aperture (NA)
0.85
0.65
Disc diameterDisc thickness
120mm1.2mm
120mm1.2mm
Protection layerHard coating
0.1mmYes
0.6mmNo
Track pitch
0.32�m
0.40�m
Data transfer rate (data)Data transfer rate (video/audio)
36.0Mbps (1x)54.0Mbps (1.5x)
36.55Mbps (1x)36.55Mbps (1x)
Video resolution (max)Video bit rate (max)
1920�1080 (1080p)40.0Mbps
1920�1080 (1080p)28.0Mbps
Video codecs
MPEG-2MPEG-4 AVCSMPTE VC-1
MPEG-2MPEG-4 AVCSMPTE VC-1
Audio codecs
Linear PCMDolby DigitalDolby Digital PlusDolby TrueHDDTS Digital SurroundDTS-HD
Linear PCMDolby DigitalDolby Digital PlusDolby TrueHDDTS Digital SurroundDTS-HD
Interactivity
BD-J
iHD

Blu-ray players
Samsung BD-P1000 Blu-ray Player


Sony BDP-S1 Blu-ray Player




Philips BDP9000 Blu-ray Player




Blu-ray movies


Seven of the eight major movie studios have announced that they will release movies in the Blu-ray Disc format as soon as hardware becomes available. The movies will feature high definition video and audio as well as advanced interactive features. Compared to standard definition (SD), which is the resolution used in today's TVs and DVDs, high definition (HD) offers five times the amount of detail. A standard TV uses either NTSC which is 480i (640�480) or PAL/SECAM which is 576i (768�576). The "i" stands for interlaced, which means that only half of the lines are updated for each frame alternating between the odd and even lines. Blu-ray movies will be in 1080p (1920�1080), which is the highest of the HD resolutions. The "p" stands for progressive, which means that every line and pixel will be updated for each frame.





Blu-ray titles announced

Title
Studio
Info
50 First Dates
Sony
Release date: May 23, 2006
A Knight's Tale
Sony
Release date: May 23, 2006
Aeon Flux
Paramount

Amityville Horror
MGM
Not yet announced, but packaging shown at CES
Angel Seekers
Air TBS
Japan only
Armageddon
Disney

Basic Instinct
Lionsgate
Not yet announced, but packaging shown at CES
Batman Begins
Warner

Behind Enemy Lines
Fox

Black Hawk Down
Sony

Blazing Saddles
Warner
Not yet announced, but Warner has stated that they will release all their titles in both formats
Bram Stoker's Dracula
Sony

Bridge on the River Kwai
Sony

Brothers Grimm
Disney

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
Warner

Chicken Little
Disney
Not a launch title, to be released later in 2006
Chronos
Goldhil
Documentary, Release date: May 23, 2006
Constantine
Warner

Crash
Lionsgate
Release date: May 23, 2006
Crimson Tide
Disney
Not yet announced, but packaging shown at CES
Dark Water
Disney

Desperado
Sony

Devil's Rejects
Lionsgate

Dinosaur
Disney

Dukes of Hazzard
Warner

Dune
Lionsgate
TV miniseries aka Frank Herbert's Dune, Release date: June/July
Everest
Disney
Documentary
Fantastic Four
Fox

Fifth Element
Sony
Release date: May 23, 2006
Flightplan
Disney
Not yet announced, but packaging shown at CES
For a Few Dollars More
MGM

Four Brothers
Paramount

Full Metal Jacket
Warner
Not yet announced, but Warner has stated that they will release all their titles in both formats
Goodfellas
Warner
Not yet announced, but packaging shown at CES
Great Raid
Disney

Green Mile
Warner
Not yet announced, but Warner has stated that they will release all their titles in both formats
Guns of Navarone
Sony

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
Warner
Not yet announced, but Warner has stated that they will release all their titles in both formats
Hero
Disney

Hitch
Sony
Release date: May 23, 2006
House of Flying Daggers
Sony
Release date: May 23, 2006
Ice Age
Fox

Incredibles
Disney
Not yet announced, but

Wednesday, May 10, 2006

What to Buy? PC or MAC?

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PC
----------
:) cheaper then MAC.
:) Completely starts in 28 minutes.
:) All of its parts are easily available in you local areas.
:) Speed is better than MAC.
:) Application support is better than MAC.(easily available.)
:) Easy to Fix.seen the test. thrown it from 1st Floor and then amazingly got that only Motherboard is affected.so got MB and some
other small parts in very less time and money.we fixed it in 3 hours...!great!

MAC
----------
:( More Price.
:)) starts in 17 minutes!amazing.
:( for some appalications,speed is lower than PC.
:) Best graphics and all releted to GUI(graphical user interface).
:( Low Application support then PC.
:( parts are not available due to license problems.
:( difficult to fix. seen the same test.Thrown its CPU from 1st floor and asked apple help line.They told that due to license problems, cant provide its parts directly.need to take the cpu and they fix it.All these takes 3 days around.!


So, if you want to buy for speed,easy repair and all then go for PC.
if you want to buy for style,looks,Graphics then go for MAC.

Note:Tests written here are seen on TV (Travell and leaving discovery,Gadgets of guys).And all information is according to the tests shown.

DAB (Digital Audio Broadcasting) Radio Vs Analog Radio

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DAB Radio
------
:) In this radio, you can get more stations (a lot more, we can not count it actually).
:( Quality of audio is not like CD as providers has reduced it.
:( And also u can not catch it while on travell in speedy car/train etc. or in some country side area.
:( Price is also more than analog one.

Analog Radio
------
:( Not more stations.(limited to 10 to 20)
:) In FM,good quality you can get.(upto CD)
:) You can catch it in most of areas and also while travelling.
:) Price is no matter here!

So,If you want to listen outside your home and anywhere you go, you should take analog one.
And if are at home, then you can listen DAB radio plugged in your home and many more options!

Wednesday, May 03, 2006

eSATA: Fast External Storage

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It may not seem like external SATA storage is anything new. After all, products like the CMS Velocity have been on the market for a couple of years now. While those drives were external SATA drives, they weren't eSATA hardware.

Part of the SATA I/O standard, eSATA isn't just internal Serial ATA slapped into an external box, but also defines the interconnect, signaling requirements and user features such as shielded cables and hot plug connections. The connector for an eSATA cable is different—you can't use a standard motherboard SATA cable. You can find more details, including white papers on various aspects of serial ATA, at the SATA-IO Web site.

Although eSATA products are now available, they're not yet widespread. It's certainly not universal on PCs yet, so if you want eSATA support, you'll likely need to install an expansion card. One interesting aspect of eSATA is its potential use in DVR products. Currently, the Scientific Atlanta 8300HD is the only shipping set-top box with an eSATA connector. Unfortunately, the eSATA feature is currently disabled, and there's no word as to whether any of the cable operators who supply the 8300HD will ever allow external hard drives to be used.
More @ Here

DAS Keyboard II Review

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We were all once, or still are, beginners with the keyboard or typewriter. Jokingly referred to as "hunt and peckers," we earned each sentence we typed--two fingers at a time, frustration included. And what can be even more frustrating than hunting for letters on a keyboard when even the keys have no characters printed on them?

Like the original Das Keyboard, the Das Keyboard II has an all-black exterior and completely blank keys, but its key action uses gold-plated mechanical switches. Pressing these "clicky" keys will conjure flashbacks of the old IBM Model M keyboards that provided very responsive tactile feedback. The 104-key USB keyboard also has five different weight zones in which different keys require different amounts of pressure to press down. This means that keys that we strike with our pinkies will require less force to press down compared with keys that we would press down with our index or thumb fingers.

Though the blank black keys are the main selling point of the keyboard, it isn't necessarily the only thing that makes the Das Keyboard an interesting input device. The build quality, tactile feedback, and sheer look and design are important considerations toward getting people to fork over some dough for this keyboard.

More @ Here

Thursday, April 27, 2006

Xenoage Java Exe Starter

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In Java you can generate executable Jar-files. But most windows users are only familiar with Exe files. Moreover it is not possible to assign icons to a Java Archive. This program solves these problems by generating an Exe with an arbitrary icon, that starts the Jar when it is launched. You can also choose which JRE versions are allowed and you can pack the Jar into the Exe file so that you need only to deliver one single file.Xenoage Java Exe Starter is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License.

More @ Here

Kodak Ships Tiny Bluetooth Camera

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Eastman Kodak has launched a new Bluetooth camera and new imaging software.

Kodak also explained its work in face-recognition technology to develop software that will automatically sort through thousands of photos to find pictures of friends or family. This is one of several technologies the company is working on in its labs, it explained.

EasyShare V610 revealed

The new camera—the Kodak EasyShare V610 dual lens digital camera—is the "world’s smallest 10X optical zoom camera," the company claims. The 6-megapixel camera uses Bluetooth wireless technology, so camera users can send (or receive) images to any nearby Bluetooth device.

The camera combines two Schneider-Kreuznach C-Variogon all-glass, non-protruding prism lenses to deliver its long zoom range. The camera ships in June 2006 and costs 349.99 pounds (US$625).
The device will record TV-quality (VGA) video at 30 frames per second, using MPEG-4 compression for optimal quality and storage size. Built-in, video-specific image stabilization technology reduces on-screen shaking from unintentional hand and camera movement.

Alongside built-in image editing tools, the camera packs some powerful extra features, principally its in-camera panorama stitching mode, which will automatically combine three pictures into a panoramic photograph without the need for a computer.

There’s also a favorites mode, which places approximately 100 favorite pictures onto an on-camera album for instant retrieval and sharing anytime, anywhere.
More @ Here

Seagate Intros Monster HD

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Record-setting drive comes in at 750GB as company continues a shift to perpendicular recording.

Seagate on Wednesday announced the biggest desktop hard drive ever—a 750GB version of its Barracuda model, fulfilling a pledge to have most of its products use the industry’s new perpendicular recording technology by the end of the year.

The news is the latest in a string of product announcements made by the company in the past several months. Since January, Seagate has unveiled perpendicular upgrades to its 1-inch ST1 drives (12GB), 2.5-inch Momentus notebook drives (160GB), and the Cheetah line (300GB), designed for enterprise customers.

Perpendicular recording packs more information on disk drives by arranging bits of data vertically rather than horizontally. The innovation eventually could lead to a fivefold increase in the capacities of traditional drives.

“750 gigabytes, for us, is just scratching the surface,” said Seagate spokesperson Mike Hall. “We’re driving toward… 2.5 terabytes.”

High Performance

The current iteration of the Barracuda family, dubbed 7200.10, features 7,200-RPM drives in varying capacities. They will be targeted at PC users craving performance, whether for video editing, high-end gaming, or external storage.

The drives could also see use in digital video recorders and some enterprise storage applications. According to Mr. Hall, the company plans to announce an external version of the drive featuring a push-button backup feature next week.

The announcement has several high points, said iSuppli analyst Krishna Chander. In addition to the drive’s record-setting capacity, the move gives Seagate the honor of being the first hard drive manufacturer to introduce a desktop drive featuring perpendicular recording.
More @ Here

Monday, April 24, 2006

Learn CSS Positioning in Simple Steps

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This tutorial examines the different layout properties available in CSS: position:static, position:relative, position:absolute, and float.

1. position:static

The default positioning for all elements is position:static, which means the element is not positioned and occurs where it normally would in the document.
Normally you wouldn't specify this unless you needed to override a positioning that had been previously set.

  #div-1 {
position:static;
}

2. position:relative

If you specify position:relative, then you can use top or bottom, and left or right to move the element relative to where it would normally occur in the document.
Let's move div-1 down 20 pixels, and to the left 40 pixels:

  #div-1 {
position:relative;
top:20px;
left:-40px;
}

Notice the space where div-1 normally would have been if we had not moved it: now it is an empty space. The next element (div-after) did not move when we moved div-1. That's because div-1 still occupies that original space in the document, even though we have moved it.

It appears that position:relative is not very useful, but it will perform an important task later in this tutorial.

3. position:absolute

When you specify position:absolute, the element is removed from the document and placed exactly where you tell it to go.
Let's move div-1a to the top right of the page:

  #div-1a {
position:absolute;
top:0;
right:0;
width:200px;
}
Notice that this time, since div-1a was removed from the document, the other elements on the page were positioned differently: div-1b, div-1c, and div-after moved up since div-1a was no longer there.

Also notice that div-1a was positioned in the top right corner of the page. It's nice to be able to position things directly the page, but it's of limited value.

What I really want is to position div-1a relative to div-1. And that's where relative position comes back into play.
Footnotes

* There is a bug in the Windows IE browser: if you specify a relative width (like "width:50%") then the width will be based on the parent element instead of on the positioning element.

4. position:relative + position:absolute

If we set relative positioning on div-1, any elements within div-1 will be positioned relative to div-1. Then if we set absolute positioning on div-1a, we can move it to the top right of div-1:

  #div-1 {
position:relative;
}
#div-1a {
position:absolute;
top:0;
right:0;
width:200px;
}
5. two column absolute

Now we can make a two-column layout using relative and absolute positioning!

  #div-1 {
position:relative;
}
#div-1a {
position:absolute;
top:0;
right:0;
width:200px;
}
#div-1b {
position:absolute;
top:0;
left:0;
width:200px;
}
One advantage to using absolute positioning is that we can position the elements in any order on the page, regardless of the order they appear in the HTML. So I put div-1b before div-1a.

But wait - what happened to the other elements? They are being obscured by the absolutely positioned elements. What can we do about that?
6. two column absolute height

One solution is to set a fixed height on the elements.

But that is not a viable solution for most designs, because we usually do not know how much text will be in the elements, or the exact font sizes that will be used.

  #div-1 {
position:relative;
height:250px;
}
#div-1a {
position:absolute;
top:0;
right:0;
width:200px;
}
#div-1b {
position:absolute;
top:0;
left:0;
width:200px;
}

7. float

For variable height columns, absolute positioning does not work, so let's come up with another solution.

We can "float" an element to push it as far as possible to the right or to the left, and allow text to wrap around it. This is typically used for images, but we will use it for more complex layout tasks (because it's the only tool we have).

  #div-1a {
float:left;
width:200px;
}
8. float columns

If we float one column to the left, then also float the second column to the left, they will push up against each other.

  #div-1a {
float:left;
width:150px;
}
#div-1b {
float:left;
width:150px;
}
9. float columns with clear

Then after the floating elements we can "clear" the floats to push down the rest of the content.

  #div-1a {
float:left;
width:190px;
}
#div-1b {
float:left;
width:190px;
}
#div-1c {
clear:both;
}

Wednesday, April 19, 2006

Seagate Debuts Perpendicular Drives

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Seagate on Tuesday announced its first 3.5-inch hard disk drives to use perpendicular storage technology. The new offerings join the company's preexisting line of Cheetah drives that sport some of the fastest data transfer rates of any hard disk available.
The drives will sport data transfer rates of 73 to 125 mbps, 30 percent faster than their predecessor. Capacities of 73GB, 147GB and 300GB would be available on one, two, and four platters, respectively. Seagate is betting on perpendicular technology as a way to fit more disk capacity into a standard-sized drive.
Today's hard drives store data lengthwise across the hard-disk platter. However, with storage demands increasing, that method is meeting its limitations.
Hard disk makers say that the laws of physics will soon prevent bits of data from being stored any closer together, meaning standard drives will hit a ceiling in terms of storage capacity before their size must be increased.
In comparison, perpendicular recording drives store data like their name implies -- perpendicular to the disk platter. This method provides two benefits, say supporters. First, data is able to be stacked closer together, allowing for higer capacity. Second, data is more easily accessible, thus allowing drives with faster data transfer rates.
The Cheetah drives would be the second line of perpendicular drives from the company. Seagate began shipping its Momentus 2.5-inch drives last month in sizes ranging from 30GB to 160GB. A 1-inch drive with perpendicular recording was also introduced at 3GSM in February.
Source:www.betanews.com

Xvid 1.1.0 released

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Xvid 1.1.0 released

This is XviD 1.1.0 release.

This release is the long awaited 1.1.0. It is mostly API compatible with the previous stable release as we dropped support for reduced resolution coding. If your application didn't use that feature then the upgrade is totally compatible.

Changes since 1.0.3:

xvidcore:
Improved Low bitrate quality.
Improved VBV support
Rate-Distortion mode decision for bvops
New postprocessing functions, brightness and deringing
New PowerPC port by Christoph Naegeli
Brand new amd64 Linux 64bit port by Andre Werthmann
Various decoder and encoder speedups
A few bugs squashed
VFW frontend
Mingw/CygWin support
Various small improvements
A few bugs squashed
DShow frontend
Mingw/CygWin support
Support for brightness control
Various small improvements
A few bugs squashed

Changes since 1.1.0-beta2:

xvidcore
Field interlaced decoding
IEEE-1180 compliant SSE2 iDCT (disabled for safety)
Fixed misaligned reads on RISC platforms such as ARM
Completed GCC 4.0 support
Export only public API on GNU/Linux and Solaris
Work on the example apps. Support for AVS input in xvid_encraw
VFW frontend
Small updates
DShow frontend
Additional fourcc support

Link:Koepi's Xvid 1.1.0
or simply search "Koepi"/"xvid" in google and you are there!

Thursday, April 13, 2006

Choose Proper Audio Format for DivX Video...

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Basically, most people use default mp3 128/96 kbps constant bitrate for Divx movie files.It is good in quality but of big size.
What i mean is, suppose your video is only some speech in the file then you need higher kbps enough to hear.when it is music or say some fast sequence in film then you need better quality andperfect sound.In CBR (Constant Bit Rate), it is constant at all the moments of file. In VBR (Variable Bit Rate), the algoritham decides what to do and what should be the quality for specific sequence.It lowers somewhat which is not needed in higher music which doen't affect you and it highers the audio when it needs to be hear perfect sound in speech.

And if you don't want to use mp3 then you can use ogg as yur audio format.It is free as well as good quality and less size.
Tools needed for video/audio conversion
1.VirtualDub/FlaskMpeg
2.lamecodec(mp3)/ogg codec
3.oggmux(To mix mute video and ogg file to make .ogm)

All these can be found on http://www.doom9.org

Wednesday, April 12, 2006

Get A Free Domain With Microsoft Office Live Basics Beta

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Believe it or not Microsoft is offering a free domain name with hosts of other features when you signup for Microsoft Office Live Basics Beta. Fortunately Microsoft Office Live Basics Beta is also free.
With Microsoft Office Live Basics Beta you get:
Your own domain nameEasy-to-use design toolsFive e-mail accountsWeb site traffic reports
But the only catch is that you need to provide your credit card details, though you wont be charged for it.
Go get your free domain here

Tuesday, April 04, 2006

The Basics Of DSL Internet Service

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The days of unreliable Internet connections, impatiently waiting for web pages to load, and waiting hours to download something from the Internet are quickly becoming obsolete. Dial-up Internet, which used to be the standard for those seeking Internet access, is rapidly being replaced by faster, more reliable Internet access technologies. One of those technologies, DSL Internet service, is one of the most popular and affordable options for the home Internet customer. There are things to be aware of though, if you are considering using DSL for your Internet access.

DSL, or digital subscriber line, is a form of broadband Internet technology, that has download speeds that span 128 Kbps (Kilobits per second) to 24,000 Kbps, depending on the level of service purchased by the customer and the particular DSL technology in use by the ISP (Internet service provider). The technology dates back to 1988, when engineers at Bellcore (formerly Bell Communications Research, Inc., now Tellcordia Technologies) developed a method of transmitting a digital signal along the unused frequency spectrum on the twisted pair cables that ran between the central office (in a phone company, the location that houses the equipment that connects phone calls) and customer locations. Using DSL allowed a regular telephone line to provide digital (Internet) service without getting in the way of existent telephone service on the line.

DSL did not take off immediately, because it was more profitable for local telephone companies to simply install a second phone line in a home in order to provide dial-up Internet service in addition to regular telephone service. However, when cable television companies began offering and implementing their new high-speed Internet technology (via cable modems) nearly a decade later, local telephone carriers jumped in with the competition and began offering up the DSL technology to customers. Today, DSL remains the primary competition for cable companies and their high-speed Internet technology.

Despite the more reliable connections and faster rates of data transmission, there are some potential drawbacks to be aware of regarding DSL Internet service. For starters, the farther your house is from the telephone company's central office, the less bandwidth you will have access to. This means slower data transmission rates, and therefore might mean less enjoyment for things like online gaming, video viewing, and picture uploading. Some might not notice the slower capacity for things like email and other basic uses, though.

Another drawback to DSL is the potential cost. There is equipment to purchase, such as the modem and DSL router, plus there are sometimes installation fees. The good news is that competition drives service providers to often offer incentives and freebies for choosing their services, such as free self-installation, rebates for equipment purchases, and large amounts of mailbox storage. However, if you are not satisfied with your DSL service, you are often contractually obligated to them for a certain period of time, and will probably be required to pay a hefty fee for canceling early (up to $200 sometimes). Monthly prices for DSL Internet service range from $14.95 per month for basic DSL to upwards of $49.96 per month for more advanced versions of the technology.

Yet another drawback to DSL Internet service is that customers often see a slower connection than promised by the ISP. This is due to some service providers oversubscribing their service. Their often just isn't enough bandwidth to go around. But ISP's make the argument that all of their customers are never online at the same time. This can be particularly frustrating for businesses using DSL that rely heavily on the Internet for their daily dealings.

Don't let the drawbacks keep you from exploring the possibility of DSL Internet service. As with any new technology, there are kinks, and ISP's work on a regular basis to make service to their customers faster and more reliable. There are also many ISP's that offer DSL for you to choose from, so the incentives and promotions for picking one over another can mean saving money and getting more extras. Though it can be frustrating and seem costly, DSL Internet service is still a more cost effective option than some of the other types of broadband Internet service, such as satellite Internet.